Ho Chi Minh: the target of the 10,000 day war

Before I get into Vietnam, I just wanted to let my readers know (all six of you) that Chapter One was just a very brief synopsis of some of the ideas and events that have led up to the modern imperialist system and what has become Capitalist Totalitarianism. I glossed over some important topics that are indeed related to the theme. Specifically: post reconstruction, sharecropping, the great migration, Jim Crow laws, and many events associated with slavery and oppression. I would also be remiss to leave out the exploitation of other minority groups like the Chinese who constructed the railroads and the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Also, I left out the expansion and take-over of Mexico and the Caribbean for furthering Imperialist interests prior to the Great Depression.

I will hopefully, in time, be able to write more thoroughly on every single issue I’ve brushed upon thus far and perhaps link a page(s) to each major theme that I glossed over — in essence, an online book of real American History, or at least a history from a perspective not commonly available to the masses. Of course, that, in and of itself will be very incomplete, yet will cover specific events and topics in far greater detail. Expect completion of my on-line History book within the next ten years — that’s the best I can promise. Now, on to Vietnam.

Historical Realities:

First things first. Any general discussions of the Vietnam War pertaining to mainstream historical analysis typically give the sanitized diatribe that US involvement in Vietnam was to stop the spread of Communism into Asia. This analysis usually includes a brief explanation of the so-called Domino Effect wherein if one state is taken over by the commies, then all surrounding states will eventually be taken over by the commies, and so on and so forth. That theory has been proven time and again to be preposterous, yet is still given as a possible rationale for US involvement.

The war in Vietnam was solely to propagate and expand imperialist interests in Southeast Asia (Indochina if you will). Not only did the US remove what was left of French Colonialism, it also confirmed that profiting from war by setting up a complex industrial base to produce the tangible units of war (IE: Military Industrial Complex) would extend the reach of Imperialism by selling the products of this industry to any small-time despot who would pay, leading to perpetual war and perpetual profits for this industry. That in turn leads to perpetual instability of the peripheral, or third world, leading to Imperialist interests being able to more easily come in and exploit natural resources and the slave labor provided by these despots for our continued military support. continue reading…