Browsing Posts in Philosophy

When Adam Smith first published The Wealth of Nations in 1776, I highly doubt he would have foreseen the current climate of a global imperialist system propagated solely for the interests of what we can describe as the Capitalist Class.

By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Smith

Within the historical context of Smith’s time, corporate charters were controlled by the state, somewhat similar to current no bid contracts granted various industries who service government projects of varying degrees. However, in Smith’s time, the state had complete control over these corporate charters, such as the the British Empire’s East India Company, which served as a sort of trading company gaining much profit from Opium among other resources to be exploited by British Colonialism. Just for a reference, Colonialism has manifested into modern Imperialism to a large extent, though that will be explained in greater detail further down the road.

Smith felt the government control of capital and business hindered the free flow of capital, thus slowing economic — or capital — growth. Smith believed the free flow of capital would ultimately lead to greater opportunities for all people to share in the wealth of this free flowing capital. This theme of capitalism without government restriction, or Laissez-faire capitalism, is the backbone of the modern libertarian movement. It’s understandable the sentiment of Smith given the historical context of state, or in Smith’s case, Monarchistic control over capital markets. Unlike what we now consider Communism, this state control of capital did not result in equal distribution of wealth, but rather the wealth being  hoarded by the Monarchy. continue reading…

Originally written on April 29, 2010

About a week ago, a good friend of mine e-mailed me an article on existentialism, after a blog post of mine had got him examining the topic. The author of the article, Alexander Green, laid out a fairly simple explanation of the basic characteristics of existentialist thought. This, in turn, got me thinking about my role in the world, both as an individual and as an activist for social change. In essence, it is the self versus the society. Perhaps that is a bit too confrontational of a description, but I do indeed at times feel pulled between my individual desires, thoughts and manifestations and the desire to exacerbate critical thinking and pro-active social change. These two worlds are most certainly not mutually exclusive, but nonetheless, it is a common tendency of the Marxist left to distance dialectical materialism from individual notions of self, and of spiritualism and the role that plays in our schema of the social world around us. continue reading…

Originally written on April 26, 2010

I consider myself to be a part of the left. No, my views and the views of others in this camp are not “radical” or “extreme” as the corporate mainstream media would lead one to believe. My views are those of an individual who has extensively studied political-economy, history and sociology. I take a rational posture when it comes to legitimate critique and analysis of modern imperialism and the role that our two-party “democracy” plays in allowing, perpetuating and exacerbating the continued hegemony of powerful corporate interests who intend to hoard the world’s resources at the expense of everyone else.

It is quite easy to point out the hypocrisy in Republican rhetoric. They claim to stand for smaller, limited and fiscally-responsible government, yet have done nothing but expand the scope of government and increase spending and debt while lowering taxes on the wealthiest citizens claiming higher taxes would lead to a stagnating economy–well, the economy has been stagnant despite the tax cuts. Republicans spout about “Christian” values and “moral righteousness,” yet they so often live lives of greed and adultery while perpetuating war throughout the world. I’m not a biblical scholar by any means, but I believe these actions would be considered antithetical to the teachings of Christ. continue reading…

Originally written on April 20, 2010

So the thing to do when working on a [tennis racquet], as in any other task, is to cultivate the peace of mind which does not separate one’s self from one’s surroundings. When that is done successfully, then everything else follows naturally. Peace of mind produces right values, right values produce right thoughts. Right thoughts produce right actions and right actions produce work which will be a material reflection for others to see of the serenity at the center of it all.  (Robert M. Pirsig)

When stringing a tennis racquet, my mind is at ease in the process. Or at least I would like to believe that. Sometimes my mind drifts to other places during the process. Perhaps a phone call while tying off a string or a doorbell or a tricky grommet. I suppose it would be the ultimate destination to be at one with the string, the racquet and the process. Every pass through the grommet, every pull of the tensioner, every weave of the cross string through the main–a natural and organic congruence of events transpiring; bringing about the perfect stringing job. String that will bring good fortune and happiness to the person who uses that string to make the perfect shot. continue reading…

Love Will Turn You Around

Originally written on April 17, 2010

My first exposure to nascar/stock-car racing came at the age of six. This was when one of the most underrated films ever made, Six Pack, was released. If one does not believe that Kenny Rogers’ striking and moving portrayal of down and out stock-car driver “Brewster Baker” was an awe-inspiring tour-de-force of cinematic history, then perhaps one needs to develop a more articulate cinematic palate such as myself. Aside from this groundbreaking movie, I had never heard of nascar, and for the most part, would have limited knowledge of its existence and surrounding subculture for another fifteen years. continue reading…

 
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